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Sacramentum
Melanie talks to Anders Brolycke, 1999

MR: Greetings Anders! When did the band form and how?

AndersAB: Sacramentum was formed at the end of summer ´90. The main purpose was to an outlet for all frustration we carried inside of us. We were also deeplydedicated to extreme metal music. These two factors resulted in a musical experience more knows as Sacramentum. Mid ´94, just after the first release of “Finis Malorum” we went through some line-up changes. We kicked out our drummer and our bass-player. Nisse took over the bass and Nicklas Rudolfsson joined in on drums. June  95 we recorded our full-length debut “Far Away From the Sun”, that was released one year later. In June  97 we signed with Century Media Records and recorded “The Coming of Chaos”. In ’98 Niclas Andersson from Lord Belial and Vassago joined in as second guitarist. With this enforced line up we entered Los Angered studios once again and recorded “Thy Black Destiny” that was released in January ’99.

Lineup:
Nisse Karlén – vocals/bass
Anders Brolycke – guitars
Niclas Andersson – guitars
Nicklas Rudolfsson – drums

MR: Describe two of your favorite songs and their composition; key elements fans should listen for, etc…

AB: It would be Demonaeon from “Thy Black Destiny” and Fog’s Kiss from “Far Away From the Sun”. Both songs contains a blend of melodic parts and pure aggression. I would like the listener to notice the overall arrangements,
the way the riffs are structured and how they are weaved together.

MR: Any words of wisdom to the masses, fans, bands, etc…??

AB: I think the whole scene is in a very critical point right now. It’s time for the fans to chose if they really wantthe black metal scene to be infested with imagefixated natureromantical vampirewannabes. See through the illusion and seperate the music from the bullshit image and listen to a record before you buy it instead of getting impressed by cool photos and attitude. Else many of the serious band will fall into oblivion and the whole underground scene will die.

MR: How well, do you find, the band has matured and evolved since the beginning?

AB: Our natural progression has been to step away more and more from all over arranged melodical bullshit to concentrate more on making less but stronger riffs. We have always wanted (and more than ever now) to play raw and aggressive music, without losing the catchyness that make you want to hear the song again and again. We have taken this development even further with our latest album “Thy Black Destiny”. A true metal fist in the face of the listener. Darkness an uncompromising chaos is what it is all about, and not even the most evil vampire-wannabe should be able to listen to it without wanting bang the head.

MR: Do you feel that the bands have a relatively large fanbase, so that there is pressure on you to impress and keep it interesting?

AB: The only pressure we feel when we compose is to make an album that we feelmore satisfied with than the one before andso far most people agree. There are more bands now in the scene than ever and even if we don’t feel
that there is a competition between the bands it makes us to our best when comes to musicianship.

MR: If you could tour with with any 4 other bands, who would they be?

AB: Morbid Angel, Angelcorpse+ Bathory anno ’88 and Venom anno ’84.

MR: What do you feel your band brings to the scene?

AB: Ever since the beginning Sacramentum has been innovative when it comes to combine the darkness from black metal with the aggression from death metal. We have always let our music speak for itself and we stand proud where we are today without image bullshit and controversial media statements. Hopefully this sincerity will pay back in the long run.

MR: What do you think of the underground metal scene?

AB: A few years ago the labels signed anything with corpsepaint and was sounding Norwegian. Now it seems like it takes more to get a deal and that is good for the scene. One other cool thing is that the interest for brutal death metal is getting stronger.

MR: What are your goals and aspirations for the band?

AB: We live for our music and our main goal is to continue to release records and to play live as much as possible. I’m addicted to playing dark and aggressive music. It’s a cleansing for both the body and for the soul. Sacramentum is latin and means something that is sacred. Everything that the band Sacramentum represents with the music, the lyrics and the whole concept of spreading chaos, are keep as sacred on a personal level by all of the members.

MR: Any funny/horror show stories?

AB: On tour and under the influence of too much whiskey anything can happen. Being on stage without remembering a thing, waking up in jail in Holland at seven in the morning, running around naked wearing only a bullet belt on stage when Old Man’s Child plays, fighting with each other etc. etc…

MR: When can your next release be expected?

AB: We are planning to record the next album in the beginning of August. It will be called “Blood of the Ancients” and it will be a kind of a tribute album to some bands that we feel deserve it a.o Bathory, Mercyful Fate and some others that nat are decided yet. It will also containtwo new songs.Ournext “real” album will be recorded in February 2000, so it will hopefully be out next spring.

MR: What can fans look forward to seeing live, and hearing on your releases?

AB: Pure energy and aggression.

MR: Is song or lyric writing collaborative, or do certain members do certain things?

AB: Me, Niclas and Nicklas make the riffs. Nisse writes most of the lyrics. We arrange everything together in the rehearsal place.

MR: What is your opinion on the present death metal scene?

AB: It’s really cool. It’s almost have the same quality as ten years ago. I most certainly enjoy bands like Death, Angelcorpse, Krisiun, Cryptopsy, Cannibal Corpse, Morbid Angel etc.The death metal scene is not infested with
attitude and that deserves my full respect. Worship of death and aggression is all what it’s about. More death metal to the people!

MR: Do you find it hard coming up with original material, seeing how thescene seems to be flooded with a lot of bands just ripping each other off and just regurgitating the same material?

AB: It’s always hard to come up with quality riffs, but we have been around for so long that wehave had our time to develope a style of our own. Rip off bands will automatically fade away as a natural selection and die if they don’t come up with anything of there own, so I don’t bother that much. Of course I always prefer to listen to the original, though.

MR: Which show was your favorite show?

AB: On the last tour we got some really cool response in Austria and in Holland. Especially one gig in Holland the crowdwas totally crazy and we tried our best to give them as much as they gave us.

MR: What are your musical and lyrical influences or inspirations, and how do you blend them to sound unique?

AB: All in the band have been into extreme metel since the mid-eighties. Back than bands like Bathory, Destruction, Coroner, Slayer, Autopsy, Death, Metallica were a big source of motivation to start an own band. Metal music is still the biggest part of my life. But today you don’t get as influenced by other bands. Since we have been around sine 1990 we have had our time to develope a style of our own. When it comes to sources of creativity aggression and frustration are two important ingredients. The lyrics are held on a personal level and deal with thoughs and reflections about life and death. They are often about a longing away from this earthly prison.The unique thing about our music I personally think is the way we combine aggression with melancholy and harmonies without compromising with any of those ingredients.

MR: Is humankind evolving into a more peaceful species or are we doomed to be petty and violent?

AB: I think that all the wars that is going on all around the world will answer that question. The human race have no other natural enemies than other humans so war and diseases is the only way to keep the increasing growth of mankind on an acceptable level. In my opinion 99% of the human population are unworthy to exist simply because they don’t even reflect over their own existence. Man claims to be the most intelligent being in the universe but he is obviously not clever enough to find out how to use his intelligece to something intelligent and how to survive as a race. Therefore I think mankind has used up its rights to exist. You can almost every day read in the news that some new war has started somewhere on earth. I think it is a wonderful sign that only proves that mankind is taking a step closer to armageddon. I find it especially amusing when I hear that the cause of the war is religious. I despise all kinds of religions, in particular Cristianity, Catholicism, Judaism and Islam, so when I hear that fanatic orthodox catholics and muslims are killing each other in the name of their respective god I’m not really the first person to cry over it.

MR: What is the funniest thing you have seen lately?

AB: Nisse performing a table dance at a party at my place wearing only a antique helmet from World War II.

MR: Is there anything you’ve ever really wanted to do with your band but haven’t been able to for one reason or another? For example…

AB: We’d really like to go to over and do a tour in the states. We’d also like to have a spectacular live show with a lot of pyro technical and light FX. But right now the budget Century Media have for us don’t allow us to do these things. Maybe in the future is we sell more albums. As always the money is the problem.

MR: Extreme metal seems to be steadily growing in appeal in the underground. Do you see that as a good thing? What effect does it have on your band?

AB: It is most certainly a good thing because it tells a lot about the world that we are living in. I think that extreme metal musical ways will appeal to a certain amount ofpeople. This kind of music is unique when comes to give an outlet for extreme inner feelings and especially frustration. When you take a look at the whole society of today you soon will realize that it is getting more and more weird and complex, so it is natural that the need for finding an outlet for frustration and anxiety is growing. For us it is of course a source of motivation if we get attention to what we create, but I don’t think that it will affect our music itself.

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